A new Collage Book by black dog publishing


Hi,
I got a lead today on a fresh new collage book being published in the UK. Here's the down-lo:

Collage Assembling Contemporary Art
Contributors: Sally O’Reilly, Ian Monroe, David Lillington and John Stezaker August 2008 Hardback 240 pages 260 b/w and colour illustrations 28 x 23 cm ISBN: 978 1 906155 39 1 UK £35.00

Collage: Assembling Contemporary Art is a striking and authoritative survey of the history of collage, from its origins through to the work being produced by artists today.
With contemporary artists reclaiming the form, collage is flourishing.From the traditional ‘cut and paste’ method through to digital, three dimensional and installation work, and in the incorporation of contemporary concerns such as environment and commercialism, collage is experiencing an exciting renaissance.
First gaining popularity in the early 1900s, with such pieces as Picasso’s The Dream in 1908 and Still Life with Chair Caning in 1912, collage has proliferated though the ages. From figures such as Kurt Schwitters, to works by the Constructivists, Dadaists, and Surrealists, to 1960s and 70s Pop Art, the form has branched out into a myriad of fine art practice that encompasses assemblage, montage, and décolage. Collage draws together the work of influential artists to contextualize the art being produced today.

Collage features the art of such internationally acclaimed artists as Picasso, Schwitters and Ernst, Hannah Hoch, Marta Rosler, John Stezaker, Richard Hamilton, Layla Curtis, David Salle, Eduardo Poalozzi, Javier Rodriguez, Robert Rauschenberg, David Thorpe, Fred Tomaselli and many more.
In addition to using works by these artists to provide a comprehensive overview of this exciting art form, Collage also includes essays written by artist and critic, Sally O’Reilly, artist Ian Monroe, and an interview between critic and writer, David Lillington, and artist, John Stezaker,
outlining the history of the medium and critically addressing how collage is being used throughout contemporary art today. A beautifully designed, extensively illustrated collection of works and writings, Collage is an essential for artists, designers and anyone with a practical interest in modern art.


black dog publishing ltd
architecture art design fashion history photography theory and things 10A Acton Street London WC1X 9 NG UK T 44 (0)207 713 8682 F 44 (0)207 713 8682 W
www.blackdogonline.com

info@blackdogonline.com

For review copies or further
information please contact William Alderwick press@blackdogonline.com

And Thanks to Matthew Rose for the tip!!

Contortionist, posed in studio

Another insane pic posted on flickr by the George Eastman House Photography Collection.
I love this striped guy!!!!!!

M.A.C.A.R.E.N.S.E.S



M.A.C.A.R.E.N.S.E.S
*GRAPHIC AGITATION FOR THE ACQUIESCENT MAJORITY*
Just what is Macarenses???

According to A. MacGregor, "the name Macarenses comes from the book 'Utopia' by Thomas More, published in 1516. Macarenses is a land not far from Utopia itself and is translated as Happiland, from Makar meaning happy. Of course, I have used this name as a pun on our present state of affairs".

I like the hidden meaning. This site is not for the timid! Every now and then I run across a collagist that is so prolific, so off the wall, so different that there is no sense in attempting an explanation. That is the case with the artwork of Andrew MacGregor. His crazy site is the home of over 300 collages, and more! Some of his pieces remind me of Hannah Hoch and the Dada collagists of times past, or websites of some mail artists that I have seen. There is a certain European Avant-garde flair in his pieces, and I love that haphazard look, and even more I love the hidden commentary on politics and our state of affairs in this world... In his words, " The website is not just my artwork but it is a storehouse of inspirations packed from floor to ceiling with words and images ranging from found items to collectable objects. There are book lists, web-links, information on artists and much much more....." Indeed he isn't kidding. I spent a bit of time roaming around his many pages, and found I could go on and on...his links list alone has a heavy sprinkling of oddness and bizarreness. I recommend visiting this site when you have the time for exploration, this is worthy of a time investment.

Baroqued


Baroqued
Originally uploaded by misphit
Further use of photography in collage.
Trying a much more open and linear approach on these. I want the photo to stand out and blend in.
Difficult stuff.
I guess that's just the thing with collage that I love so much. I make up endless games and rules for each piece, and my brain just gushes over it's own intense puzzles! Even if only I ever notice the slight nuances in each line, the multiple slices that make up a figure, it doesn't matter. My brain had the infinite pleasure of figuring it all out.

Parallactic


Parallactic
Originally uploaded by misphit
Very sleek and more graphic work I have been doing. Utilizing photos as much as I can.

She Had Developed a Case of Forked Lightning

Just Some Recent Work.
Sorry I have been absent for a week or so, been creating!!!
I have a back up of cool posts to put up. Hang tight y'all.

Pastepapers - Texture


Thru bookbinding channels, I found out today about paste papers. They are papers that are made by adding color to either paste or methyl cellulose. This mixture is then applied to a sheet of paper and then objects are often dragged over the paper to create patterns. Sounds bizarre and ends up 3d perhaps? Haven't seen these in person, however these links will lead to some fine examples, some of which could be downloaded.
Deutsche National Bibliothek
Panther Peak Bindery
These folks create new papers you can purchase if you like.
Shepherds
Buntpapier


Dolmetsch, Helene, Stuttgart, 1909
Why am I posting this on a collage blog? Because they would make excellent backgrounds in their own right, and perhaps they could inspire one to create their own textures. I really like the fingerpainted homespun look they have.


Behrens, Lilli, Düsseldorf, 1904